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Hengyuwooden Private

1 month ago Multimedia Warangal   25 views

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Wood has played an important role in the history of civilization. Humans have used it for fuel, building materials, furniture, paper, tools, weapons, and more. And demand for wood continues to increase annually, spurring conflicts between neighboring states over control of shared resources. Our relationship to this resource has remained relatively unchanged over time, and our methods of developing and managing woodlands continue to rely on tried and true techniques established by early civilizations. So perhaps this is why we take it for granted: wood has long been a part of our lives, and we probably can't really imagine it not being there.



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    Anyone who has ever tried to light a fire knows that there are two types of wood: softwoods and hardwoods. For fires, hardwoods will burn hotter and longer—important factors when you're trying to ward off the chill—while softwoods will ignite more easily so it makes excellent kindling. Softwoods are the source of about 80% of the world’s lumber so when we talk about wood, more often than not, we're talking about softwoods. These woods include cedars, Douglas firs, cypresses, firs, junipers, kauris, larches, pines, hemlocks, redwoods, spruces, and yews. The wood from these trees tends to be more malleable. However, the softwood/hardwood division is not concrete: some softwoods are harder than some hardwoods. The Douglas fir and the yew listed above, for example, are actually mechanically harder than several hardwoods. In general, softwoods tend to be far less expensive in comparison to hardwoods and are used more frequently in construction.



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    Strong states and nations have typically had access to a generous timber supply that they draw upon liberally to further their own development. These fortunate states have followed a similar pattern in the treatment of their lumber resources. First, they use their own virgin forests. Then they begin to barter with neighbors, and trade relations may be established for that purpose. Finally, they manage to cultivate timber for consumption, but may continue to import materials to supplement their stores from countries still possessing a lumber surplus. This is the story in the lumber trade that echoes over centuries, from India to the Americas. It perpetuates a cycle of diminished resources that often leaves behind a trail of disenchantment and bitterness between industry and the citizens of the state or nation.



    Even as developing nations cut the softwoods under their control to participate in the global trade of this resource, it should be noted that the areas where these trees grow would be cleared in the course of development. In an ideal relationship, lumber trade should feed capital back into the nation to assist in sustained-yield practices. However, demand usually outstrips production—both internally and externally.



    Logging itself depletes forest stocks before they can be replenished. Regulated timber harvesting should not permanently damage the forest, but in many smaller nations, timber extraction is not monitored. And as mentioned previously, without proper support any state management program is bound to fail—sustained-yield practices require support from local groups to be effective.